Newsletter – June 2019

Enews – June 2019

In this month’s Enews we report on the latest OTS report on simplification of everyday tax for smaller businesses as well as HMRC tackling dishonest dog breeders.

We also update you on the Welsh tax code ‘mix up’ as well as the consultations on various issues including Companies House reforms, Private Residence Relief and letting relief changes.

Finally, with the latest advisory fuel rates for company cars, the P11D deadline looming and non-compliance with minimum wage regulations, there is a lot to update you on.

OTS calls for simplifying everyday tax for smaller businesses

A report by the Office of Tax Simplification (OTS) calls on the government to prioritise action to ‘address long-standing concerns about the experience of smaller businesses’. The report considers the business lifecycle, especially those starting up and provides recommendations in five areas:

  • providing simple step-by-step guidance about the key things a business needs to do in its early days to help things run smoothly
  • improving the operation of the PAYE system
  • implementation of HMRC’s Agents Strategy
  • improving the mechanics of the Corporation Tax return process
  • ensuring that tax changes are built on an understanding of business processes.

If you would like any help with your taxes at any stage of your business life cycle, please do get in touch.

Internet link: GOV.UK simplifying tax

HMRC taskforce tackles dishonest dog breeders

A taskforce has recovered more than £5 million by tackling dishonest dog breeders selling pups on the black market. HMRC set up the taskforce in October 2015 after discussions with animal welfare groups that were concerned that tens of thousands of puppies were being reared in unregulated conditions and sold illicitly every year.

The taskforce uncovered fraudsters selling puppies on a mass scale, for a huge profit and due to the underground nature of the activity, failing to declare their sales.

Using civil and criminal enforcement powers, HMRC has recovered £5,393,035 in lost taxes from 257 separate cases since the formation of the taskforce in October 2015.

The breeders and traders targeted include:

  • two unconnected puppy breeders in the west of Scotland who were handed tax bills of £425,000 and £337,000
  • a puppy breeder in the Midlands who was a former Crufts judge, given a £185,000 bill
  • a dealer in Northern Ireland told to pay £185,000 in tax
  • a Somerset puppy breeder was given a £114,000 bill
  • a puppy dealer in the east of Scotland was handed a tax bill in excess of £400,000
  • a Swansea puppy breeder was given a £110,000 tax bill.

Financial Secretary to the Treasury, Mel Stride MP, said:

‘It is utterly appalling that anyone would want to treat puppies in such an inhumane way and on such a scale. It’s also deeply unfair to all of the legitimate businesses who do pay the right tax, and the total recovered by the taskforce is equivalent to the annual salaries for more than 200 newly qualified teachers.’

‘We continue to work hard with other government agencies and our partners to tackle these traders. We urge anyone with information about tax evasion to report it to HMRC online or call our Fraud Hotline on 0800 788 887.’

Internet link: GOV.UK news

Forms P11D – reporting employee benefits

The forms P11D which report details of benefits and some expenses provided to employees and directors for the year ended 5 April 2019, are due for submission to HMRC by 6 July 2019. The process of gathering the necessary information and completing the forms can take some time, so it is important that this process is not left to the last minute.

Employees pay tax on benefits provided as shown on the P11D, generally via a PAYE coding notice adjustment or through the self assessment system. Some employers ‘payroll’ benefits and in this case the benefits do not need to be reported on forms P11D but employers should advise employees of the amount of benefits payrolled.

In addition, regardless of whether the benefits are being reported via P11D or payrolled the employer has to pay Class 1A National Insurance Contributions at 13.8% on the provision of most benefits. The calculation of this liability is detailed on the P11D(b) form. The deadline for payment of the Class 1A NIC is 19th July 2019 (or 22nd for cleared electronic payment).

HMRC has produced an expenses and benefits toolkit. The toolkit consists of a checklist which may be used by advisers or employers to check they are completing the forms correctly.

If you would like any help with the completion of the forms or the calculation of the associated Class 1A NIC please get in touch.

Internet links: HMRC guidance Toolkit

Welsh taxpayers income tax code mix-up

From April 2019, Welsh taxpayers were assigned new income tax codes beginning with the letter ‘C’. However, HMRC recently revealed that some Welsh taxpayers were mistakenly given Scottish income tax codes by their employers. As a consequence, Welsh taxpayers have been charged income tax using the Scottish income tax rates and bands.

For 2019/20 the Welsh rate of income tax is set at 10% and this is added to the UK rates, which are each reduced by 10%. Therefore, the overall tax payable by Welsh taxpayers continues to be the same as English and Northern Irish taxpayers.

The income tax rates and bands that apply to employment income, self-employed trade profits and property income are different for taxpayers who are resident in Scotland, with tax rates and bands ranging from 19% to 46% rather than the 20% to 45% which apply across the rest of the UK. Tax codes for Scottish taxpayers begin with the letter ‘S’.

HMRC stated that it does not know the full extent of the error or how many Welsh taxpayers have been affected but they will carry out a review of the operation of Welsh tax codes in June 2019.

Llyr Gruffydd, Chair of the National Assembly for Wales’ Finance Committee, said:

‘We raised concerns about the flagging process for identifying Welsh taxpayers during our enquiries into fiscal devolution and the Welsh government’s draft budget.

‘On each occasion, we were told the matter was in hand, and the lessons from the devolution of income tax powers to Scotland, where there were similar issues, had been soundly learned and would be put into effect. We are seeking an immediate explanation of how this has happened and will be asking representatives from HMRC to appear before this Committee in the near future.’

If you have any concerns about tax codes, please get in touch.

Internet links: HMRC letter Welsh Assembly news

Consultation on Companies House reforms

The government has launched a consultation on proposed reforms at Companies House, including a ‘major upgrade’ of its register.

The consultation aims to tackle misuse of the register. It also strives to provide business owners with ‘greater protection from fraud’.

The consultation seeks views on a series of reforms to limit the risk of misuse:

  • knowing who is setting up, managing and controlling companies
  • improving the accuracy and usability of data on the companies register
  • protecting personal information on the register
  • ensuring compliance, sharing intelligence and other measures to deter abuse of corporate entities

Louise Smyth, Chief Executive of Companies House, said:

‘This package of reforms represents a significant milestone for Companies House as they will enable us to play a greater part in tackling economic crime, protecting directors from identity theft and fraud, and improving the accuracy of the register.’

The consultation is open until 5 August 2019.

Internet links: GOV.UK consultation GOV.UK news

Consultation on ancillary capital gains reliefs

A capital gains tax (CGT) exemption applies when an individual disposes of a dwelling that has been used as their only or main residence under the Private Residence Relief (PRR) rules. The exemption applies as long as the relevant conditions are met throughout the total period of ownership. This relief is supplemented by ancillary reliefs that aim to deal with other related situations.

The government has previously announced and legislated to reform two of the ancillary reliefs to better target PRR at owner-occupiers. The reliefs which are being amended are:

  • the final period exemption will be reduced from 18 months to nine months, although the special rules that give those with a disability, and those in care, an exemption of 36 months will not change
  • lettings relief will be reformed so that it only applies where an owner is in shared occupancy with a tenant.

These changes will take effect from 6 April 2020. The government is now consulting on the changes in more detail and on how they will work in practice. It also invites views on some technical aspects of the PRR rules.

Internet link: GOV.UK consultation

Advisory fuel rates for company cars

New company car advisory fuel rates have been published which take effect from 1 June 2019. The guidance states: ‘You can use the previous rates for up to one month from the date the new rates apply’. The rates only apply to employees using a company car.

The advisory fuel rates for journeys undertaken on or after 1 June 2019 are:

Engine size Petrol
1400cc or less 12p
1401cc – 2000cc 15p
Over 2000cc 22p
Engine size LPG
1400cc or less 8p
1401cc – 2000cc 9p
Over 2000cc 14p
Engine size Diesel
1600cc or less 10p
1601cc – 2000cc 12p
Over 2000cc 14p

HMRC guidance states that the rates only apply when you either:

  • reimburse employees for business travel in their company cars or
  • require employees to repay the cost of fuel used for private travel.

You must not use these rates in any other circumstances.

The Advisory Electricity Rate for fully electric cars is 4 pence per mile. Electricity is not a fuel for car fuel benefit purposes.

If you would like to discuss your car policy, please contact us.

Internet link: GOV.UK AFR

Non-compliance with minimum wage regulations

A recent Low Pay Commission (LPC) report sets out its findings on the number of people being paid less than the statutory minimum wage.

The LPC found that, in April 2018, 439,000 workers were paid less than the National Minimum Wage (NMW). Of this amount, 369,000 were employees aged 25 and over, who were paid less than the National Living Wage (NLW), an increase from previous years. On 1 April 2019, the NMW and NLW rates rose to the hourly rates detailed below:

Minimum wage rate Hourly rate from 1 April 2019
National Living Wage (for workers aged 25 and over) £8.21
21-24 year-old rate £7.70
18-20 year-old rate £6.15
16-17 year-old rate £4.35
Apprentice rate £3.90
Accommodation Offset £7.55 per day: £52.85 per week

The LPC also revealed that women are ‘more likely’ than men to be paid less than the NMW, and that underpayment is common amongst younger and older workers. In addition, underpayment was more common in certain sectors including hospitality, retail, cleaning, maintenance and childcare.

Commenting on the findings, Bryan Sanderson, Chair of the LPC, said:

‘Our analysis reveals a worrying number of people are being paid less than the minimum wage. We recently celebrated 20 years of the minimum wage – it has raised pay for millions of workers, but it is essential that people receive what they are entitled to.’

‘It is also vital for businesses to be able to operate on a level playing field, and not be illegally undercut on wages.’

Contact us for help with payroll issues.

Internet link: GOV.UK news

Newsletter – April 2019

Enews – April 2019

In this month’s Enews we report on tax changes for the new tax year and an update on the Structures and Building Allowance following the Spring Statement. We also consider MTD for VAT which has now come into effect, the delays to the rise in probate fees and the call for a tax on social media businesses.

With ongoing Brexit uncertainties, the government has issued additional Brexit advisory documents for small businesses. We take a look at a case that HMRC has won involving contractor loan schemes and consider form P11D completion.

Reporting Benefits in Kind – Forms P11D

The forms P11D which report details of benefits and some expenses provided to employees and directors for the year ended 5 April 2019, are due for submission to HMRC by 6 July 2019. The process of gathering the necessary information can take some time, so it is important that this process is not left to the last minute.

Employees pay tax on benefits provided as shown on the P11D, generally via a PAYE coding notice adjustment or through the self assessment system. Some employers ‘payroll’ benefits and in this case the benefits do not need to be reported on forms P11D but employers should advise employees of the amount of benefits payrolled.

In addition, regardless of whether the benefits are being reported via P11D or payrolled the employer has to pay Class 1A National Insurance Contributions at 13.8% on the provision of most benefits. The calculation of this liability is detailed on the P11D(b) form. The deadline for payment of the Class 1A NIC is 19th July 2019 (or 22nd for cleared electronic payment).

HMRC has produced an expenses and benefits toolkit. The toolkit consists of a checklist which may be used by advisers or employers to check they are completing the forms correctly.

If you would like any help with the completion of the forms or the calculation of the associated Class 1A NIC please get in touch.

Internet links: HMRC guidance Toolkit

Additional Brexit advisory documents for small businesses

The government has published additional documents containing advice on Brexit for UK small businesses.

According to the government, the information will help business owners to ‘understand how leaving the EU may affect their business’. The advisory documents cover a range of issues, from changes to UK-EU trade following Brexit, to alterations to how businesses send and receive personal data.

Amidst ongoing Brexit uncertainty the government is urging businesses to ‘prepare now’. Businesses that import or export goods to the EU are urged to apply for a UK Economic Operator Registration and Identification (EORI) number if they have not already done so, in order to continue trading with the EU post-Brexit.

Businesses that provide services to or operate in the EU may need to comply with new rules following Brexit. A business could be affected if it has a branch or branches in the EU; it operates in a services sector within the EU; it is planning a merger with an EU company; or if its employees have to travel to EU or European Economic Area (EEA) countries for business.

Meanwhile, businesses that hold intellectual property are warned that they may face changes to their copyright, patents, designs and trademarks following Brexit.

The government is urging small firms to utilise the Exit Tool.

Internet link: EU Exit tool

Delay to rise in probate fees

The government has delayed its planned increase in probate fees indefinitely.

The delay has been attributed to ‘pressure on Parliamentary time‘ caused by Brexit debates and votes.

The increase in fees had been set to take effect from 1 April 2019, but HMRC recently made the decision to postpone the rise. Under government plans, the proposed probate fees are as follows:

Value of estate Proposed Fee
Up to £50,000 or exempt from requiring a grant of probate £0
£50,000 – £300,000 £250
£300,000 – £500,000 £750
£500,000 – £1m £2,500
£1m – £1.6m £4,000
£1.6m – £2m £5,000
Above £2m £6,000

While the changes are pending, a temporary process is in place for applying for probate, and estates will not incur the higher fees if applications are made before the fee changes take effect.

A spokesperson for HMRC said:

‘Probate registries will accept applications before processing by us as long as they are assured the inheritance tax (IHT) forms from us will be coming shortly.

‘Our processes aren’t changing, it’s just that probate registries will be willing to accept applications before our processing is done when normally it would need to be after.’

Internet link: Gov.uk news

Update on Structures and Buildings Allowance

Chancellor Philip Hammond delivered the Spring Statement on Wednesday 13 March 2019 amidst all the Brexit debates.

In his speech the Chancellor provided an update on the economy and responded to the Office for Budget Responsibility forecasts. In addition he launched consultations on various aspects of the tax system together with updates on earlier consultations.

One area subject to consultation is the Structures and Buildings Allowance (SBA). The SBA gives relief for expenditure on certain structures and buildings. The allowance is available for new structures and buildings intended for commercial use, and the improvement of existing structures and buildings. The SBA will be also available on the cost of converting or renovating existing premises to qualifying use. Relief is limited to the original cost of construction or renovation and given across a fixed 50-year period, at an annual flat rate of 2% regardless of changes in ownership.

Only certain expenditure will qualify. The structures or buildings must be brought into use for qualifying activities. These include trades, professions or vocations and certain UK or overseas property businesses – essentially commercial property lettings.

Relief will be given on eligible construction costs incurred on or after 29 October 2018. Where a contract for the physical construction work is entered into before this date, relief is not available. The consultation on draft legislation is open until 24 April 2019.

Internet links: WMS and Consultation

MTD for VAT

HMRC is phasing in its landmark Making Tax Digital (MTD) regime, which will ultimately require taxpayers to move to a fully digital tax system. Under the new rules, businesses with a taxable turnover above the VAT threshold (currently £85,000) must keep digital records for VAT purposes and provide their VAT return information to HMRC using MTD functional compatible software.

The new rules have effect from 1 April 2019 where a taxpayer has a ‘prescribed accounting period’ which begins on that date, or otherwise from the first day of a taxpayer’s first prescribed accounting period beginning after 1 April 2019. For some VAT-registered businesses with more complex requirements the rules will not have effect until 1 October 2019. Included in the deferred start date category are VAT divisions, VAT groups and businesses using the annual accounting scheme.

The government has confirmed that a light touch approach to penalties will be taken in the first year of implementation. Advising that where businesses are doing their best to comply, no filing or record keeping penalties will be issued as the focus will be on supporting businesses to transition to MTD. The government has confirmed that it will not be mandating MTD for any new taxes in 2020.

Figures published by HMRC show that almost 1.2 million businesses are affected by MTD for VAT.

Financial Secretary to the Treasury, Mel Stride MP, said:

‘In a world where businesses are already banking, paying bills and shopping online, it is important that the tax system moves into the 21st century.’

Internet link: GOV.UK

Call for tax on social media businesses

A group of MPs has called on the government to tax the profits of social media businesses.

The All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Social Media and Young People’s Mental Health and Wellbeing recently published a report which outlined the impact of social media on the health of young people.

The APPG has suggested creating a Social Media Health Alliance, which would be funded by a 0.5% tax on the profits of social media companies. MPs hope that the money would be used to fund research and help ‘draw up clearer guidance’ on the impact of social media on health and wellbeing.

Internet link: Royal Society for Public Health

Changes to income tax for 2019/20

The new tax year brings changes to income tax bands and allowances.

The personal allowance is £11,850 for 2018/19 and increases to £12,500 for 2019/20. There is a reduction in the personal allowance for those with ‘adjusted net income’ over £100,000. The reduction is £1 for every £2 of income above £100,000. So for 2018/19 there is no personal allowance where adjusted net income exceeds £123,700. For 2019/20 there is no personal allowance available where adjusted net income exceeds £125,000.

The marriage allowance permits certain couples, where neither pays tax at more than the basic rate, to transfer 10% of their personal allowance to their spouse or civil partner.

The basic rate of tax is 20%. In 2018/19 the band of income taxable at this rate is £34,500 so that the threshold at which the 40% band applies is £46,350 for those who are entitled to the full personal allowance. In 2019/20 the basic rate band increases to £37,500 so that the threshold at which the 40% band applies is £50,000 for those who are entitled to the full personal allowance.

Individuals pay tax at 45% on their income over £150,000.

Scottish residents

The tax on income (other than savings and dividend income) is different for taxpayers who are resident in Scotland to taxpayers resident elsewhere in the UK. The Scottish income tax rates and bands apply to income such as employment income, self-employed trade profits and property income.

In 2018/19 and 2019/20 there are five income tax rates which range between 19% and 46%. Scottish taxpayers are entitled to the same personal allowance as individuals in the rest of the UK. The two higher rates are 41% and 46% rather than the 40% and 45% rates that apply to such income for other UK residents. For both 2018/19 and 2019/20, the threshold at which the 41% band applies is £43,430 for those who are entitled to the full personal allowance.

Welsh residents

From April 2019, the Welsh Government has the right to vary the rates of income tax payable by Welsh taxpayers. The UK government has reduced each of the three rates of income tax paid by Welsh taxpayers by 10 pence. The Welsh Government has set the Welsh rate of income tax at 10 pence which will be added to the reduced rates. This means the tax payable by Welsh taxpayers continues to be the same as that payable by English and Northern Irish taxpayers.

Internet links: GOV.UK GOV.SCOT income tax GOV.WALES income tax

HMRC wins disguised remuneration avoidance case

HMRC has won a legal case over a contractor loan scheme endorsed by Hyrax Resourcing Ltd. As a result, HMRC will now be able to collect more than £40 million in unpaid taxes.

The scheme in question was a disguised remuneration avoidance scheme, which paid users in loans, rather than salaries, to avoid paying income tax and national insurance contributions on earnings.

Hyrax Resourcing Ltd will now be required to disclose details of the tax avoidance scheme, including the names and addresses of 1,180 individuals who used it. Failure to provide the relevant information could result in Hyrax Resourcing Ltd becoming liable for substantial penalties.

Financial Secretary to the Treasury, Mel Stride MP, said:

‘HMRC is cracking down on the unscrupulous promoters who sell these highly contrived tax avoidance loan schemes.

‘Promoters need to take note of this decision and make sure they contact HMRC urgently about schemes they haven’t yet disclosed.’

Internet link: HMRC news

Newsletter – May 2018

eNews May 2018

In this month’s eNews we report on the latest announcement from HMRC regarding Making Tax Digital. We also consider the looming deadline for GDPR, changes to tax reliefs following the Scottish Budget and issues to do with EMI share options. With articles on benefits in kind forms P11D,the VAT fuel scale charges and a new benefits exemption for workplace charging of employee vehicles there is lots to consider.

Changing priorities at HMRC

Over the coming years, the government plans to phase in its landmark Making Tax Digital (MTD) initiative, which will see taxpayers move to a fully digital tax system. However HMRC has shared a statement about how they are prioritising change in the department and as a result some parts of MTD will be delayed. HMRC has acknowledged the challenges in:

  • exiting the EU and
  • the ambition to become the world’s most digitally advanced tax authority.

While some of the finer details are still being decided, HMRC have announced that, to achieve the above, some aspects of MTD are to be delayed. HMRC still plan to go ahead with MTD for VAT from April 2019. Information on some of the delayed projects is set out below:

Plans to introduce further digital services for individuals

There will be ‘halted progress’ on simple assessment and real-time tax code changes. Additional services in this area will only be added where they reduce phone or post contact or otherwise deliver ‘significant savings’.

Other digitalisation of services affecting fewer individuals

This includes Inheritance Tax payments, Tax Advantaged Venture Capital Schemes applications and PAYE Settlement Agreements

Creation of the single digital account for all businesses

HMRC has confirmed this will now happen at a ‘slower pace’. HMRC has confirmed the single digital account remains an aim of the department and they stress it will not impact the delivery of Making Tax Digital.

Voluntary Making Tax Digital for Business service for income tax

HMRC has confirmed this will continue to be available for any sole trader wishing to make quarterly updates to HMRC.

Mandatory Making Tax Digital for VAT – still ‘on track’

HMRC stated that MTD for VAT is still on track. VAT registered businesses with a turnover in excess of the £85,000 VAT registration threshold, will be required to comply with the requirements of MTD for VAT for all VAT periods commencing on or after 1 April 2019.

In addition, the government has confirmed that, it will not mandate any further MTD for Business changes before 2020, at the earliest.

Internet link: ICAEW blog

GDPR compliance deadline looms

With less than one month until the introduction of the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), the Federation of Small Businesses (FSB) is warning small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) that time is running out for them to prepare.

The business group stated that small businesses face an ‘uphill challenge’ in ensuring that they are compliant by the date when GDPR takes effect of 25 May 2018.

Under the new rules, organisations which collect, store and process individuals’ personal data will be subject to new obligations, with an increased emphasis on accountability and transparency.

The financial penalties for failing to comply are severe, with fines costing up to €20 million or up to 4% of total annual worldwide revenue, whichever is the greater.

Mike Cherry, National Chairman of the FSB said:

‘As the GDPR deadline swiftly approaches, there is a real danger that many small businesses are yet to have adequately prepared for the changes. Fortunately for these businesses, there is still time on the clock to start, or finish, their preparations.’

‘The GDPR is the largest shake-up of data protection laws for years, and whether you are a personal trainer or a consultant, most businesses will have to implement changes to their current practices to make sure they are complying with the new rules.’

Further information on the GDPR can be found on the ICO website.

Internet links: ICO guidance FSB press release

Tax reliefs following the Scottish Budget

The Government has stated that it will ensure that tax reliefs continue to work as they were intended as the new Scottish Income Tax rates and bands are introduced from 6 April 2018. The Government has confirmed:

  • Marriage Allowance
    Marriage Allowance allows taxpayers to transfer 10% of their tax-free Personal Allowance to their spouse or civil partner, reducing their tax bill by up to £230 in 2017 to 2018, and £238 in 2018/19. The UK government will ensure that all those claiming Marriage Allowance in Scotland can continue to do so at the current rate (20%).
  • Gift Aid
    Gift Aid allows charities to claim back 25p for every £1 donated. The UK government will make changes to ensure that Scottish taxpayers can benefit from the right rate of tax relief on Gift Aid. Gift Aid will continue to be paid to charities at the basic rate, with Scottish taxpayers able to claim the correct amount of additional relief on top of this.
  • Pensions relief at source
    The UK government confirmed that current processes will continue while it works with stakeholders to establish how this will work in the longer term. For 2018/19, Scottish taxpayers who receive relief on their contributions at source will, therefore, continue to receive relief in their pension pot at 20%, with no adjustment for those taxed at a rate of less than 20%, and scope for those taxed at a rate higher than 20% to claim additional relief.
  • Social security pension lump sum
    The UK government will make changes so that Scottish taxpayers who receive a social security pension lump sum will be taxed, where appropriate, at the new Scottish starter rate.
  • Finance cost relief This will continue to apply at 20%, the same rate applicable to landlords across the UK.

Please contact us if you have queries on the workings of any of these tax reliefs for Scottish taxpayers and those resident elsewhere across the United Kingdom.

Internet link GOV.UK changes to tax relief Scotland

EMI options may not qualify for tax relief

The Enterprise Management Incentive (EMI) allows selected employees (often key to the employer) to be given the opportunity to acquire a significant number of shares in their employer through the issue of options. An EMI can offer significant tax advantages as the share option scheme allows options to be granted to employees which may allow the shares to be received without any tax bill arising until the shares are sold.

HMRC have warned that EMI share options granted in the period from 7 April 2018 until EU State Aid approval is received may not be eligible for the tax advantages presently afforded to option holders, and accordingly share options granted in that period as EMI share options may necessarily fall to be treated as non-tax advantaged employment-related securities options meaning that the options may be taxable when exercised.

To read more, please visit the link below or contact us for specific advice.

Internet link: GOV.UK EMI Bulletin

P11D deadline approaching

The forms P11D which report details of benefits and some expenses provided to employees and directors for the year ended 5 April 2018, are due for submission to HMRC by 6 July 2018. The process of gathering the necessary information can take some time, so it is important that this process is not left to the last minute.

Employees pay tax on benefits provided as shown on the P11D, generally via a PAYE coding notice adjustment or through the self assessment system. Significant changes were introduced to the rules for reporting expenses from 6 April 2016.

Some employers ‘payroll’ benefits and in this case the benefits do not need to be reported on forms P11D but employers should advise employees of the amount of benefits payrolled.

In addition, regardless of whether the benefits are being reported via P11D or payrolled the employer has to pay Class 1A National Insurance Contributions at 13.8% on the provision of most benefits. The calculation of this liability is detailed on the P11D(b) form. The deadline for payment of the Class 1A NIC is 19th July (or 22nd for cleared electronic payment).

HMRC produce an expenses and benefits toolkit. The toolkit consists of a checklist which may be used by advisers or employers to check they are completing the forms correctly.

If you would like any help with the completion of the forms or the calculation of the associated Class 1A NIC please get in touch.

Internet links: HMRC guidance Toolkit

VAT fuel scale charges

HMRC have issued details of the updated VAT fuel scale charges which apply from the beginning of the next prescribed VAT accounting period starting on or after 1 May 2018.

VAT registered businesses use the fuel scale charges to account for VAT on private use of road fuel purchased by the business.

Please do get in touch for further advice on this or other VAT matters.

Internet link: GOV.UK fuel scale charges

HMRC consultation on benefits exemption for workplace charging facilities

HMRC are consulting on the tax exemption which will apply from 6 April 2018 on workplace electric charging facilities used by employees.

It was announced in the Autumn Budget 2017 that the government intends to implement an exemption for the benefit of electricity provided by an employer, at the workplace, to charge electric or plug-in hybrid vehicles. The necessary legislation will be included in the Finance Bill later this year and its effect will be made retrospective to 6 April 2018.

This means that there is no need for employers to report the value of electricity provided for the workplace charging of employees’ vehicles from that date.

This consultation seeks comments on workplace charging tax exemptions for electric and plug-in hybrid vehicles.

This guidance will be of interest to employers that pay taxable benefits to employees and provide electric charging points for employee use and the provision of workplace charging facilities, which vehicles the exemption covers and the qualifying conditions of the exemption.

Internet link: GOV.UK consultations/draft guidance

Newsletter – May 2017

Enews – May 2017

In this month’s eNews we report on the short Finance Act which has been rushed through Parliament in advance of the General Election. We also include details of changes to the off payroll working rules that exclude some businesses from being unintentionally caught by the provisions. We also consider changes to the timing of issuing PAYE coding notices and the P11D deadline together with the launch of the latest National Savings and Investment Bond.

General Election and tax law

With the announcement of a snap General Election on 8 June the time available for scrutinising proposed legislation was short so the Finance Act was rushed through Parliament. Many clauses have not made it to the final legislation due to time constraints. These include the provisions to enable Making Tax Digital, changes for Non Domiciled individuals and corporate losses.

The clauses are likely to be reinstated after the General Election, when, hopefully, there will be more time to debate the measures in greater detail. The clauses that will make it through to the Finance Act are contained in the version of the Finance Bill introduced into the House of Lords.

Anita Monteith, tax manager at ICAEW said:

‘Making Tax Digital plans remain controversial and need more scrutiny by those who will be affected, and most importantly proper parliamentary debate – a clear roadmap as to how MTD will work in practice is needed.’

‘MTD is not coming into effect until April 2018, and the announcement of the general election on 8 June 2017 provided an opportunity to withdraw these clauses and schedule from the Finance Bill which will be debated today and likely to be enacted on 27 April.’

‘These seminal clauses and schedule can be reintroduced after the election which will allow more time for proper scrutiny.’

Internet links: ICAEW news Parliamentary Bill

Business response to General Election on 8 June

In response to the announcement of a General Election on 8 June Carolyn Fairbairn, CBI Director-General, said:

‘With a snap General Election now called, businesses will be looking to each political party to set out their plans to support economic stability and prosperity over the next Parliament in a way that is fair and sustainable for communities across the UK. ‘Distraction from the urgent priorities of seeking the best EU deal and improving UK productivity must be kept to a minimum.’

‘Firms will want to hear commitments from all parties to work in close partnership with business and back a new Industrial Strategy to make the UK economy the most competitive in the world by 2030.’

‘It is essential to get the UK’s foundations right, from building a skills base for the next generation, to investing in infrastructure, energy and delivering a pro-enterprise tax environment.’

‘As EU negotiations now get underway, firms are clear about the serious risks of failing to secure a deal and falling into World Trade Organisation rules. It is vital that negotiators secure some early wins and all parties should commit to working to ensure businesses can continue to trade easily with our EU neighbours, while seeking new opportunities around the world.’

‘Whoever forms the next Government, they should seek to build a partnership between business and government that is the best in the world, based on trust and shared interest.’

Internet link: CBI News

Off payroll working in the public sector rules amended

From 6 April 2017, new tax rules were introduced which potentially affect individuals who provide their personal services via their own companies (PSCs) to an organisation which has been classified as a ‘public authority’. Amendments have now been made to the definition of a public authority.

Where these rules apply:

  • the public authority (or an agency paying the PSC) calculates a ‘deemed payment’ based on the fees the PSC has charged for the services of the individual
  • the entity that pays the PSC for the services must first deduct PAYE and employee National Insurance contributions (NICs) as if the deemed payment is a salary payment to an employee
  • the paying entity will have to pay to HMRC not only the PAYE and NICs deducted from the deemed payment but also employer NICs on the deemed payment
  • the net amount received by the PSC can be passed onto the individual without paying any further PAYE and NICs.

The rules were intended to cover those engaged by public sector organisations including government departments and their executive agencies, many companies owned or controlled by the public sector, universities, local authorities, parish councils and the National Health Service.

However, prior to this amendment, private sector retail businesses including high street pharmacies and opticians would have inadvertently been within the scope of the off payroll working in the public sector measure. As a result, such businesses would have been required to consider whether the new rules applied to all contractors working for them through an intermediary. This was not the intention of this policy and the rules have been amended.

The rules operate in respect of payments made on or after 6 April 2017. This means that they are relevant to contracts entered into before 6 April 2017 but where the payment for the work is made after 6 April 2017.

If you would like any help with these new rules contact us.

Internet link: GOV.UK amendment

P11D deadline approaching

The forms P11D which report details of benefits and some expenses provided to employees and directors for the year ended 5 April 2017, are due for submission to HMRC by 6 July 2017. The process of gathering the necessary information can take some time, so it is important that this process is not left to the last minute.

Employees pay tax on benefits provided as shown on the P11D, generally via a PAYE coding notice adjustment or through the self assessment system. Significant changes were introduced to the rules for reporting expenses from 6 April 2016.

Some employers payrolled the benefits and in this case the benefits do not need to be reported on forms P11D but employers should advise employees of the amount of benefits payrolled.

In addition, regardless of whether the benefits are being reported via P11D or payrolled the employer has to pay Class 1A National Insurance Contributions at 13.8% on the provision of most benefits. The calculation of this liability is detailed on the P11D(b) form. The deadline for payment of the Class 1A NIC is 19th July (or 22nd for cleared electronic payment). As 22nd July is a Saturday it may be appropriate to ensure cleared payment is made by Friday 21st July unless you can arrange for faster payment.

HMRC produce an expenses and benefits toolkit. The toolkit consists of a checklist which may be used by advisers or employers to check they are completing the forms correctly.

If you would like any help with the completion of the forms or the calculation of the associated Class 1A NIC please get in touch.

Internet links: HMRC guidance Toolkit

VAT fuel scale charges

HMRC have issued details of the updated VAT fuel scale charges which apply from the beginning of the next prescribed VAT accounting period starting on or after 1 May 2017.

VAT registered businesses use the fuel scale charges to account for VAT on private use of road fuel purchased by the business.

Please do get in touch for further advice on this or other VAT matters.

Internet link: GOV.UK fuel scale charges

Investment Bond launched

National Savings and Investments (NS&I) has recently launched a government-backed Investment Bond. The main details of the Bond are as follows:

  • minimum deposit of £100
  • balances on the account must be between £100 – £3000
  • applications can only be made online and up to April 2018
  • applicants must be aged 16+ years
  • fixed interest rate of 2.2% for three years paid yearly and without tax deduction
  • early withdrawals incur a penalty equal to 90 days’ interest on the amount cashed in.

According to Moneyfacts, the NS&I offering is a market leader on the interest rate with similar three-year fixed term bonds having an average interest rate of 1.24%. Competitors’ minimum investment thresholds are generally higher, typically starting upwards from £1,000 and caps on the maximum capital invested are significantly higher than the NS&I limit of £3,000.

Internet links: GOV.UK news NS&I Moneyfacts

Changes to the PAYE Tax system using Real Time Information

HMRC have announced that from the end of May 2017 they will be using Real Time Information (RTI) to make adjustments to employee tax codes in-year as and when the need arises.

HMRC states that this change in procedures will:

  • offer more certainty to employers and their employees
  • reduce the instances of unexpected tax bills arising
  • ensure that more employees end the tax year having paid the right amount of tax.

Details of the change in procedures can be found in the HMRC Policy Paper briefing ‘Changes to our PAYE Tax System – helping customers pay the right amount of tax on time’. Further information about the changes can be found on page 4 of the Employer Bulletin April 2017 (Issue 65).

The Policy Paper confirms that individuals will be issued with a new tax code if their circumstances change. This brings about a marked change from the current system which deals with adjustments after the tax year end and codes any underpayment out via a coding notice adjustment in a subsequent tax year.

Affected employees should shortly be in receipt of tax code notices explaining the changes to the system and what they can do if they need help and support to manage their taxes.

Under the new procedures, once HMRC are aware that an employee’s circumstances have changed, they will amend the individual’s tax code and follow it up with a notification of the amendment to the employee. A copy notification will also be sent to the employer. It is important for employers and employees to ensure that HMRC are made aware of any changes in an individual’s circumstances as soon as possible.

Employers are advised to expect, from 1 June onwards, some employee enquiries relating to tax code changes. In the longer term, HMRC envisages reduced contact from employees regarding under or overpayments of tax.

If you would like help with Payroll or checking your tax code please contact us.

Internet links: GOV.UK Briefing Employer Bulletin 65

Newsletter – June 2016

Henry Cooper is walking 2016 km in the year 2016!

Henry is walking 2016 km in the year 2016, to raise some funds for the Thames Valley Air Ambulance.

Please click below, to sponsor him – thank youJustGiving - Sponsor me now!

Advisory fuel rates for company cars

New company car advisory fuel rates have been published which took effect from 1 June 2016. The guidance states: ‘You can use the previous rates for up to one month from the date the new rates apply’. The rates only apply to employees using a company car.

The advisory fuel rates for journeys undertaken on or after 1 June 2016 are:

Engine size Petrol
1400cc or less 10p
1401cc – 2000cc 13p
Over 2000cc 20p
Engine size LPG
1400cc or less 7p
1401cc – 2000cc 9p
Over 2000cc 13p
Engine size Diesel
1600cc or less 9p
1601cc – 2000cc 10p
Over 2000cc 12p

The guidance states that the rates only apply when you either:

  • reimburse employees for business travel in their company cars
  • require employees to repay the cost of fuel used for private travel

You must not use these rates in any other circumstances.

If you would like to discuss your car policy, please contact us.

Internet link: GOV.UK AFR

PAYE 3 days grace and risk based penalties to continue

HMRC have confirmed, in their updated guidance, that the three day easement and risk assessed approach to issuing penalties will continue to apply for 2016/17. As a result employers will not incur penalties for delays of up to three days in filing PAYE information during the 2016/17 tax year.

Late filing penalties will continue to be reviewed on a risk-assessed basis rather than be issued automatically.

Employers are required to file a Full Payment Submission (FPS) on or before each payment of wages is made to employees. Limited exceptions apply to this deadline which are set out at https://www.gov.uk/running-payroll/fps-after-payday’.

HMRC will not charge a late filing penalty for delays of up to three days after the statutory filing date, however employers who persistently file late, will be monitored and may be contacted or considered for a penalty.

If you would like help with payroll matters please do get in touch.

Internet link: GOV.UK Penalties

VAT Flat Rate Scheme guidance updated

HMRC have issued updated guidance on the operation of the VAT Flat Rate Scheme which allows taxpayers to calculate the VAT payable by applying a flat rate percentage to their VAT inclusive turnover, rather than netting off output and input VAT due on sales and purchases.

The revision in the guidance follows a number of unsuccessful visits to the First Tier Tribunal (FTT). HMRC has issued a revised version of VAT notice 733 Flat Rate Scheme to update their guidance in accordance with the FTT decisions.

The previous version of the notice listed a number of trades and professions (at paragraph 4.4 of the guidance) and indicated the relevant sectors and percentages that these types of business should choose. These had a higher percentage than the 12% rate which applies to ‘business services not listed elsewhere’.

The FTT was critical of HMRC in their rigid interpretation of their own guidance. Although this section of the guidance has not been removed, taxpayers are now advised to ‘use ordinary English’ and choose the sector which ‘most closely describes what your business will be doing in the coming year’. The new guidance confirms that HMRC will not change a business’s choice of sector retrospectively as long as the choice was reasonable.

Please contact us if you would like any advice on VAT matters.

Internet link: VAT Notice 733

NAO report says HMRC’s customer service quality ‘collapsed’

According to a report by the National Audit Office (NAO) the quality of service at HMRC ‘collapsed’ over an 18 month period between 2014 and 2015.

The report found that average call waiting times tripled in 2014/15 and in the first seven months of 2015/16. Call waiting times for self assessment tax returns peaked at 47 minutes last autumn, which resulted in HMRC having to bring in 2,400 extra staff for their tax helpline.

Using HMRC’s own criteria, the NAO valued people’s time at an average of £17 an hour, and, as a result, calculated that callers would have wasted a total of £66 million while waiting on the phone, £21 million while actually talking to HMRC and £10 million on the cost of the call itself.

The NAO report blames the poor performance on HMRC’s decision to cut 11,000 staff between 2010 and 2014 in the move to persuade more people to complete their tax returns online. The report claims that HMRC ‘misjudged the cumulative impact of its complex transition and released too many customer service staff before completing service changes’.

In other words, it greatly underestimated how many call centre staff would still be required to help taxpayers with self assessment queries.

Amyas Morse, head of the NAO, said:

‘HMRC’s overall strategy of using digitally enabled information to improve efficiency and deliver service in new ways make sense to the NAO. This does not change the fact that they got their timing badly wrong in 2014, letting significant numbers of call handling staff go before their new approach was working reliably.

This led to a collapse in service quality and forced a rapid expansion of headcount. HMRC needs to move forward carefully and get their strategy back on track while maintaining, and hopefully improving, service standards.’

HMRC said its service levels had improved since the period analysed in the NAO report, and that, over the last six months, call waiting times had averaged six minutes.

Ruth Owen, HMRC’s director general for customer services, said:

‘We recognise that early in 2015 we didn’t provide the standard of service that people are entitled to expect and we apologised at the time. We have since fully recovered and are now offering our best service levels in years.’

Internet links: NAO press release HMRC news

HMRC update phishing scam advice

HMRC have updated their guidance to taxpayers on how to spot phishing scam emails.

Phishing is the fraudulent act of emailing a person in order to obtain their personal/financial information such as passwords and credit card or bank account details. These emails often include a link to a bogus website designed to encourage the unwary to enter their personal details.

The HMRC guidance is designed to help taxpayers to recognise genuine contact from HMRC, and how to tell when an email/text message is phishing/bogus.

Internet link: HMRC guidance

HMRC urges claimants to renew tax credits online

HMRC are urging people to renew their tax credits claim well before the 31 July deadline.

HMRC have made improvements to the online renewal service and recommend claimants renew their claim online once they receive their renewal pack which is issued between April and June. The online service can now accommodate all changes in circumstances (working hours, childcare costs or income) which affect the amount of someone’s entitlement.

Nick Lodge, HMRC’s Director General, Benefits and Credits, said:

‘Our online service means that you can renew at any time of the day or night, and on any device, without having to call us. Online help can also answer most queries you may have and a web chat facility will be available to support people renewing online. We urge everyone who can to go online.

Our customers should check their details and renew early to ensure they get the right money. The sooner people renew their claim, the sooner we can check payments are correct, meaning we avoid paying too little money, or too much, which claimants then have to pay back.

This year, claimants renewing online will be able to access further information, including viewing their next payment, through their own online Personal Tax Account.

Internet link: Press release

P11D deadline approaching

The forms P11D, and where appropriate P9D, which report details of expenses and benefits provided to employees and directors for the year ended 5 April 2016, are due for submission to HMRC by 6 July 2016. The process of gathering the necessary information can take some time, so it is important that this process is not left to the last minute.

Employees pay tax on benefits provided as shown on the P11D, either via a PAYE coding notice adjustment or through the self assessment system. In addition, the employer has to pay Class 1A National Insurance Contributions at 13.8% on the provision of most benefits. The calculation of this liability is detailed on the P11D(b) form. The deadline for payment of the Class 1A NIC is 19th July (22nd for cleared electronic payment).

HMRC produce an expenses and benefits toolkit. The toolkit consists of a checklist which may be used by advisers or employers to check they are completing the forms correctly.

If you would like any help with the completion of the forms or the calculation of the associated Class 1A NIC please get in touch.

Internet links: HMRC guidance Toolkit

Newsletter – May 2015

May 2015 Enews

In this month’s eNews we report on a number of issues including recent warnings over pension scams, guidance on the things to avoid when completing forms P11D and the latest labour market statistics. We also include links to the latest Pensions Regulator auto enrolment guidance for employers with no workers and the updated VAT fuel scale charge rates.

Please contact us if you would like further information.

Parliamentary processes

With the political parties campaigning well underway in anticipation of the General Election on 7 May and Parliament having been prorogued there are few Government announcements to report this month. However by the time we issue next month’s eNews we will have a new Parliament.

For details of the relevant dates and formal procedures visit the following link.

Internet link: GOV.UK news

Latest labour market statistics

The Office for National Statistics has issued the latest labour market data for the three months to February 2015 which show that unemployment fell by 76,000 to 1.84 million.

Neil Carberry, CBI Director for Employment and Skills said:

‘It’s great to see 248,000 more people in work, the fastest rise in employment in just under a year – thanks to our flexible jobs market.

With real wage growth rising people have a little more money in their pockets. But we need to see a recovery in productivity before wages can rise faster.’

Internet links: ONS statistics CBI news

Warning over pension scams

Those approaching retirement are being urged to be aware of a rise in pension scams, as criminals seek new ways to defraud pensioners.

Savers have been urged to be aware of a rise in pension scams, as criminals seek new ways to defraud pensioners. A report produced by Citizens Advice looked at 150 cases where pensioners had fallen victim to fraudsters. The report identified common types of scams which include:

  • encouraging pensioners to move their savings into a ‘new’ pension
  • fake investment opportunities and
  • offering apparently ‘free advice’ and support which actually costs money.

In some cases pensioners are charged a fee for a service that isn’t required, while others are encouraged to part with personal information and bank details, either by email or phone.

Gillian Guy, Chief Executive of Citizens Advice said:

‘Scammers see pensioners as a prime target….‘There are many people looking to benefit from the new pension rules, including scammers. Fraudsters can ruin people’s retirement plans by taking a portion or all of a victim’s pension pots.’

The Pensions Regulator (TPR) has recently launched a campaign to alert people to the danger posed by fraudsters.

From 6 April 2015 individuals have more flexibility as to how they use their pension pot, including the option to choose to take all their savings as a cash lump sum. TPR has warned that scammers are exploiting this change by enticing those about to retire with promises of ‘one-off investments‘ or ‘pension loans’ or ‘upfront cash’, most of which are bogus.

Individuals who believe they are being targeted by a pension scam should contact the Pensions Advisory Service on 0300 123 1047. The Financial Conduct Authority’s website also has a list of known scams. Visit scamsmart.fca.org.uk.

Internet links: Citizens Advice publications Press release

TPR guidance for small employers with no ‘staff’

The Pensions Regulator (TPR) has updated its guidance on pensions auto enrolment including what businesses need to do when they have no workers.

If you would like help with auto enrolment please do get in touch.

Internet link: TPR guidance

Lack of awareness of VAT rules

According to research 36% of the UK’s smallest businesses are unaware of the rules governing VAT thresholds.

A third of the UK’s smallest businesses are unaware of the rules governing VAT thresholds, recent research has revealed.

This lack of understanding could mean that approximately 780,000 businesses are at risk of being fined by HMRC.

Meanwhile, according to the research, 9%% of small businesses intentionally limit their trading in order to avoid reaching the VAT threshold.

Under the current rules, where a taxable person (for example an individual, company or partnership) has VAT taxable turnover of more than the current registration threshold of £82,000 in a rolling 12 month period or where turnover is expected to exceed the registration threshold in the next 30 day period then they must register for VAT.

It is important to monitor turnover, as there is a penalty for late registration in addition to the tax payable.

Please contact us if you would like advice on VAT issues.

Internet links: icaew news GOV.UK news

P11D forms – don’t get them wrong

HMRC have published a list of common errors in the completion of forms P11D. The information is part of the latest Employer Bulletin and we have reproduced the guidance below.

  • Submitting duplicate P11D information on paper where P11D information has already been filed online to ensure ‘HMRC have received it’. These duplicates can cause processing problems.
  • Using a paper form that relates to the wrong tax year – check the top right hand corner of the first page.
  • Not ticking the ‘director’ box if the employee is a director.
  • Not including a description or abbreviation, where amounts are included in sections A, B, L, M or N of the form.
  • Leaving the ‘cash equivalent’ box empty where you’ve entered a figure in the corresponding ‘cost to you’ box of a section.
  • Completing the declaration on the final FPS/EPS submission accurately (for those employers whose software package requires them to be completed) or question 6 in section A of RT 4 form to indicate whether P11Ds are due.
  • Not advising HMRC either by paper form P11D(b) or electronic submission that there is no Benefits in Kind & Expenses return to make.
  • Where a benefit has been provided for mixed business and private use, entering only the value of the private-use portion – you must report the full gross value of the benefit.
  • Not completing the fuel benefit box/field where this applies. This means an amended P11D has to be sent in.
  • Incorrectly completing the ‘from’ and ‘to’ dates in the ‘Dates car was available’ boxes. For example entering 06/04/2014 to 05/04/2015 to indicate the car was available throughout that year. If the car was available in the previous tax year, the ‘from’ box should not be completed and if the car is to be available in the next tax year, the ‘to’ box should not be completed.

If you would like help with the completion of the forms P11D please contact us.

Internet link: Employer Bulletin 53

VAT fuel scale charges

HMRC have issued details of the updated VAT fuel scale charges which apply from the beginning of the next prescribed VAT accounting period starting on or after 1 May 2015.

VAT registered businesses use the fuel scale charges to account for VAT on private use of road fuel purchased by the business.

Please do get in touch for further advice on VAT matters.

Internet link: GOV.UK news

VAT recovery on car-derived vans and combi vans

HMRC have issued a list of makes and models of car derived vans and combi vans which VAT registered businesses can use to determine if the VAT paid on the purchase can be reclaimed as input tax.

The issue is that VAT will normally be claimable in full on the purchase of a commercial vehicle. However if the vehicle purchased is a passenger car VAT is not recoverable unless it is used ‘exclusively for the purposes of a business’. Generally cars are therefore VAT ‘blocked’ and no input VAT is recoverable.

The VAT guidance states

‘Motor car means any motor vehicle of a kind normally used on public roads which has three or more wheels and either:

a) is constructed or adapted solely or mainly for the carriage of passengers; or

b) has to the rear of the driver’s seat roofed accommodation which is fitted with side windows or which is constructed or adapted for the fitting of side windows’

Whether or not a vehicle is commercial is not specifically defined but instead the definition of a car excludes:

  • vehicles capable of accommodating only one person or suitable for carrying twelve or more people including the driver
  • vehicles of more than three tonnes unladen weight;
  • caravans, ambulances and prison vans
  • special purpose vehicles such as ice cream vans, mobile shops, hearses, bullion vans and breakdown and recovery vehicles
  • vehicles constructed to carry a payload of one tonne or more.

Many car-derived vans are not cars for VAT purposes as they have no rear seats, have metal side panels to the rear of the front seats and a load area which is highly unsuitable for carrying passengers etc.

HMRC have issued the clarification due to developments in the car-derived van market as some vehicles with a payload of less than one tonne, have ‘blurred’ the distinction between cars and vans.

If you would like help with this or any other VAT issue please contact us.

Internet link: GOV.UK news

 

Newsletter – May 2014

In this month’s enews we update you on pertinent announcements from HMRC for employers. We also look at issues relevant to businesses.

Please contact us if you would like any further information.

 

 

More HMRC guidance on the Employment Allowance

The Employment Allowance of up to £2,000 is available to most employers from 6 April 2014. Employers can reduce the amount of National Insurance contributions (NICs) they pay for their employees by up to £2,000. This is called the ‘Employment Allowance’.

Employers generally won’t have to pay any employer National Insurance contributions at all if they usually pay less than £2,000 a year.

HMRC has updated the guidance on eligibility for the Employment Allowance.

For help with payroll matters please do contact us.

Internet link: Employment allowance eligibility  Employment allowance key facts

P11D forms don’t get them wrong

HMRC have published a list of common errors in the completion of forms P11D and guidance that medical benefits for lower paid employees are not reportable. The information is part of the lengthy Employer Bulletin so we have reproduced the guidance below.

Common Mistakes

The following is a list of common errors which are easily avoidable but can delay processing and cause problems with employees’ tax codes each year:

  • Submitting duplicate P11D information on paper where P11D information has already been filed online to ensure ‘HMRC have received it’. These duplicates can cause processing problems
  • Using a paper form that relates to the wrong tax year – check the top right hand corner of the first page
  • Not ticking the ‘director’ box if the employee is a director
  • Not including a description or abbreviation, where amounts are included in sections A, B, L, M or N of the form
  • Leaving the ‘cash equivalent’ box empty where you’ve entered a figure in the corresponding ‘cost to you’ box of a section
  • Not correctly completing the declaration on the final FPS/EPS submission (for those employers operating PAYE in ‘real time’) or the box in Part 5 of form P35 (Employers Annual Return) to indicate whether or not P11Ds are due
  • Where a benefit has been provided for mixed business and private use, entering only the value of the private-use portion – you must report the full gross value of the benefit
  • Not completing the fuel benefit box/field where this applies. This means an amended P11D has to be sent in
  • Incorrectly completing the ‘from’ and ‘to’ dates in the ‘Dates car was available’ boxes. For example entering 06/04/2013 to 05/04/2014 to indicate the car was available throughout that year. If the car was available in the previous tax year, the ‘from’ box should not be completed and if the car is to be available in the next tax year, the ‘to’ box should not be completed i.e. left blank.’

The Employer Bulletin also includes guidance on a common error relating to the incorrect completion of a form P9D in relation to private medical insurance provided to lower paid employees. The HMRC guidance states:

Are You Completing P9D’s Needlessly for Employees in Receipt of Medical Benefit?

Do you know that if your employees earn less than the rate of £8,500 AND you arrange and pay the provider directly for the treatment or insurance a P9D does NOT need to be completed.

For more information go to www.hmrc.gov.uk/payerti/exb/a-z/m/medical-treatment.htm

If you would like any help with the completion of the forms or the calculation of the associated Class 1A National Insurance liability please get in touch.

Internet link: www.hmrc.gov.uk/payerti/exb/forms.htm

Shared Parental Leave

The current system of statutory pay and leave entitlements for employed parents is to be reformed for babies due (or adopted children placed) on or after 5 April 2015. The following guidance in contained in the lengthy Employer Bulletin so we have reproduced it in full.

The Government is reforming the statutory pay and leave entitlements available to employed parents. For babies due on or after 5 April 2015 a new entitlement of Shared Parental Leave (SPL) will replace Additional Paternity Leave and Pay. The parents of babies due on or before 4 April 2015 will continue to be eligible for Additional Paternity Leave and Pay.

SPL gives families greater choice over how they arrange childcare in the first year, by allowing working mothers the option to end their maternity pay and leave early and to share untaken leave and pay with their partner. An adopter will similarly be able to bring their adoption leave and pay to an early end to opt into Shared Parental Pay (ShPP) and Leave.

It is intended to enable fathers to take a greater role in caring for a child, and to help both parents to better balance childcare responsibilities with staying in work. For businesses, this helps them keep their best talent and allows employers to recruit with confidence that their women employees will be less likely to drop out of the workforce when they have children.

How does it work?

Current entitlement to 52 weeks statutory maternity/adoption leave, 39 of which is paid, and 2 weeks of statutory paternity leave and pay is all unchanged. The first six weeks of Statutory Adoption Pay will increase to 90% of average weekly earnings.

Working parents of a baby due or an adoptive child placed on or after 5 April 2015 may be eligible for SPL and ShPP. Under SPL, mothers/adopters will be able to choose to end their maternity/adoption leave and pay early (at any point from 2 weeks after the birth/placement), and share their untaken pay and leave with their partner. Shared parental leave and pay can be stopped and started and parents can be off at the same time, if they wish.

Parents will be able to take their leave in phases, for example 20 weeks for the mother/adopter, followed by 20 weeks for the father/partner, followed by 10 weeks for the mother/adopter. So it may be the case that statutory parental pay is paid over one or two discontinuous periods. Parents must notify their employers of their plans under SPL 8 weeks before they become eligible for it, and all shared leave and pay must be taken between the birth/placement and the child’s first birthday.

What do employers need to do?

We expect the first notifications of intention to take SPL to arrive with employers from February 2015. The Government will provide an online form for parents to use. Some employers may wish to create their own requirements for how their employees notify them.

We anticipate that employers will need to update payroll systems where relevant to accommodate providing statutory parental pay to employees taking SPL, and to enable these payments to be paid discontinuously where necessary.

The Government will provide online tools to check eligibility, and publish detailed guidance on the rules around SPL. A key part of SPL is the discussion between employer and employee to agree the phasing of SPL and the return to work, and ACAS will also publish guidance to support this process.’

We will update you when further information is released. Please do get in touch if you would like further guidance on this area.

Internet links: Employer Bulletin

Icebreaker tax avoidance scheme rejected by HMRC

In a high profile decision HMRC has won a case in which the Icebreaker partnership schemes were shut down, after the tribunal ruled it was set up to shelter more than £120m in tax.

The wealthy members of the scheme, which included Gary Barlow and two of his former Take That band mates, claimed to be active partners trading in the creative industries, selling, for example, the rights to a song or an idea for a book. They claimed tax relief on greater losses than they invested in the partnerships. The return on the partners’ ‘investment’ was the tax relief, which was considerably larger than their cash contribution.

A HMRC spokesperson said:

‘HMRC has put in place generous reliefs to support genuine business investment and our tax reliefs for the creative industries work well, enabling the UK’s world-class film, television and video production companies to compete on the global stage.

But we will not tolerate abuse of the system by people trying to dodge their tax obligations. HMRC will continue to challenge in the courts and anyone who engages in tax avoidance schemes risk not only the high cost of these schemes but also lay themselves open to penalties and, potentially, prosecution.’

The scheme was rejected by a First-tier Tribunal.

Internet link: News  Tribunal

Pay your PAYE on time or face in-year interest on late payments

HMRC have issued further guidance on late payment interest on PAYE and CIS payments for 2014/15 onwards and how to avoid it.

HMRC now charges interest on any late PAYE and Construction Industry Scheme (CIS) payments.

To avoid an interest charge employers should pay by the due date, the difference between the following:

  • what they report on their Full Payment Submission(s) (FPS) received by the 19th of the month following the end of the tax month it relates to, together with any CIS charges for that tax month
  • any deductions reported on an Employer Payment Submission (EPS), again received by the 19th of the month following the end of the tax month it relates to.

Any corrections made to wages reported on an FPS that HMRC receives after the 19th of the month following the end of the tax month it relates to will be included in the following month’s charge. In these circumstances, the amount payable for the tax month is the amount actually reported by the 19th (rather than the corrected amount).

Interest charges

HMRC will charge interest daily, from the date a payment is due and payable to the date it is paid in full.

Accruing Interest and the Business Tax Dashboard

Employers will be able to see an estimate of the interest building up on the Business Tax Dashboard.

Please be aware that HMRC have stated:

‘Accrued interest is only a guide to what may be due. HMRC will only seek payment of interest when the amount due is settled.

The Business Tax Dashboard will only show interest as accruing in the current month, regardless of when the payment was due.

It will show interest as accruing from the 19th of each month, regardless of how the employer pays. Employers who pay electronically should not worry if they see an accrued interest entry between 19th and 22nd of a month. Once the electronic payment is received, the calculation will correctly use the 22nd as the due date, and any interest charge generated between the 19th and 22nd will be cancelled.

Currently, there is an HMRC systems error which results in the Business Tax Dashboard showing interest accruing despite the employer having submitted an EPS that clears the original charges. This error will be corrected shortly. In the meantime, HMRC will not pursue this charge and employers do not need to contact HMRC about this.’

Please do get in touch if you would like help with payroll issues.

Internet links: News

VAT update and fuel scale charges

HMRC have issued guidance on a number of VAT changes including confirmation of the updated VAT Fuel scale charges which apply from the beginning of the next prescribed VAT accounting period starting on or after 1 May 2014.

Please do get in touch for further advice on VAT matters.

Internet link: VAT update  VAT fuel scale charges

Proposed new rules for easier prosecution of offshore tax evaders

The government will consult on plans to introduce a new strict liability criminal offence for individuals who hide their money offshore.

HMRC would no longer need to prove that individuals who have undeclared income offshore intended to evade tax, in order for the offence to be a criminal conviction.

Currently HMRC have to demonstrate that even when someone failed to declare offshore income that the individual intended to evade tax. This change will mean HMRC only has to demonstrate the income was taxable and undeclared meaning it will be easier to secure successful prosecutions of offshore tax evaders.

As well as introducing the new criminal offence, the government will consult on a range of options building on the existing penalties to make sure they act as a clear and effective deterrent.

Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, said:

‘The government has taken significant steps to clamp down on those hiding their money offshore. HMRC has brought in over £1.5billion over the last two years and, through our leadership at the G8, we have taken significant steps towards greater transparency and tax information sharing.

But there can be no let up and we will continue to pursue offshore tax evaders. Those who continue to believe they can hide wealth offshore should know that there is no safe haven and that serious consequences await them.’

Internet links: News

Late payments to smaller businesses on the increase

According to a recent survey by the Forum of Private Business (FPB) almost one in four smaller businesses experienced an increase in the number of late payments during 2013.

Approximately a third of businesses surveyed reported an increase in the average number of days beyond the payment deadline that payments were made. FPB Chief Executive Phil Orford commented that more than £30 billion still remains ‘tied up in late payments’.

Internet link: Press release

Newsletter – April 2014

In this month’s enews we report on pensions announcements and other issues pertinent to employers with many deadlines approaching.

Please contact us if you would like any further information.

 

 

HMRC guidance on new pension flexibility

Following the Budget announcements regarding pension flexibility HMRC have now issued some guidance for those individuals who may wish to review their pension options.

New rules are being introduced to ensure that people do not lose their right to a tax-free lump sum if they would rather use the new flexibility this year or next, instead of buying a lifetime annuity.

Internet link: Pensions flexibility

Employers no longer able to reclaim SSP

The Percentage Threshold Scheme (PTS), which allows employers to reclaim Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) in certain circumstances, is abolished from 6 April 2014.

Under PTS employers have been able to reclaim SSP where the SSP paid is more than 13% of the Class 1 NIC due for the month. Employers are not entitled to recover any of the SSP paid to their employees unless they qualify for the reimbursement scheme.

The following example explains how the scheme worked for a tax month:

SSP paid = £630.00
Gross NI £3,704.29 x 13% = £481.56
SSP recoverable: (£630 – £481.56) = £148.44

From 6 April 2014 employers are unable to recover SSP however they will continue to be able to recover unclaimed SSP for previous years until 5 April 2016. Do contact us if you think this may apply to your business.

The government has announced that the current PTS funding will be moved into a new scheme to help employees who have been incapacitated for four weeks or more get back to work as part of the government’s Health Work and Wellbeing Initiative.

Internet link: Employer bulletin

Disclosure facility for those with undisclosed second incomes

The Second Incomes Campaign is an opportunity open to individuals in employment who have an additional untaxed source of income.

The new facility allows those with untaxed income to get up to date with their tax affairs in a simple, straightforward way and take advantage of the best possible terms.

If you would like any advice on this area please do get in touch.

Internet links: Second incomes campaign  Guide to disclosure

More guidance on Class 3A NIC

Further guidance has been issued on Class 3A National insurance contributions (NIC).

In the autumn of 2013 the Government announced plans to introduce a scheme to allow pensioners to top up their Additional State Pension by paying a new class of voluntary National Insurance contribution, to be known as Class 3A.

‘The scheme will open in October 2015 and will be available to all pensioners who reach State Pension age before the introduction of the new State Pension in April 2016. The scheme is expected to run for 18 months.’

‘Class 3A will give pensioners an option to top up their pension by up to £25 a week in a way that will protect them from inflation and offer protection to surviving spouses. In particular, it could help women, and those who have been self-employed, who tend to have low additional State Pension entitlement.’

Internet link: Publication

More HMRC guidance on the Employment Allowance

The Employment Allowance of up to £2,000 is available to most employers from 6 April 2014. Employers can reduce the amount of National Insurance contributions (NICs) they pay for their employees by up to £2,000. This is called the ‘Employment Allowance’.

Employers generally won’t have to pay any employer National Insurance contributions at all if they usually pay less than £2,000 a year.

HMRC has issued more guidance on the practicalities of claiming the allowance which can be found by visiting the link below.

For help with payroll matters please do contact us.

Internet links: Employment allowance detail  Employment allowance key facts

Tax-free childcare

Details of the new Tax-Free Childcare scheme which is to be launched in autumn 2015 have been announced.

The scheme will be worth a maximum of £2,000 per child per year. The maximum amount due is calculated on 20% of the costs of childcare (up to a total of childcare costs of £10,000 per child per year).

The scheme will be launched in autumn 2015. All children under 12 within the first year of the scheme will be eligible. To qualify for Tax-Free Childcare all parents in the household must:

  • meet a minimum income level based on working eight hours per week at the National Minimum Wage (around £50 a week at current rates)
  • each earn less than £150,000 a year, and
  • not already be receiving support through Tax Credits or Universal Credit.

Self-employed parents will be able to get support with childcare costs in the Tax-Free Childcare scheme, unlike the current employer supported childcare scheme. To support newly self-employed parents, the Government is introducing a ‘start-up’ period. During this period a newly self-employed parent will not have to earn the minimum income level.

The current system of employer supported childcare will continue to be available for current members if they wish to remain in it or they can switch to the new scheme. Employer supported childcare will continue to be open to new joiners until the new scheme is available.

It is proposed that parents register with the Government and open an online account. The scheme will be delivered by HMRC in partnership with National Savings and Investments, the scheme’s account provider. The Government will then ‘top up’ payments into this account at a rate of 20p for every 80p that families pay in.

Internet link: News

Increase in NMW rates

The Government has approved a rise in the National Minimum Wage rates which will come into effect on 1 October 2014:

  • a 19p (3%) increase in the adult rate (from £6.31 to £6.50 per hour)
  • a 10p (2%) increase in the rate for 18 to 20 year olds (from £5.03 to £5.13 per hour)
  • a 7p (2%) increase in the rate for 16 to 17 year olds (from £3.72 to £3.79 per hour)
  • a 5p (2%) increase in the rate for apprentices (from £2.68 to £2.73 per hour.

The rise will take effect in October 2014, as Business Secretary Vince Cable has accepted in full the independent Low Pay Commission’s recommendations for 2014, including plans for bigger increases in future than in recent years.

The Low Pay Commission (LPC) has said the rise, the first real terms cash increase since 2008, is manageable for employers and will support full employment.

Business Secretary Vince Cable said:

‘The recommendations I have accepted today (12 March 2014) mean that low paid workers will enjoy the biggest cash increase in their take home pay since 2008. This will benefit over 1 million workers on National Minimum Wage and marks the start of a welcome new phase in minimum wage policy.’

Meanwhile HMRC have revealed some of the excuses given for not paying the NMW.

Internet links: Press release  HMRC NMW excuses

Advisory fuel rates for company cars and fuel benefit charge

Where private fuel is provided by the employer for a company car then a separate benefit is assessable on the employee. This benefit charge is calculated by applying the same percentage figure used to calculate the company car benefit to a fixed figure which for 2014/15 is set at £21,700. The percentage is linked to the car’s CO2 emission figures.

Now is a good time to consider whether this benefit is value for money for both the employee and employer.

The alternative is to reimburse the employee for business miles using the company car advisory fuel rates. The current rates are:

Engine size Petrol
1400cc or less 14p
1401cc – 2000cc 16p
Over 2000cc 24p

 

Engine size LPG
1400cc or less 9p
1401cc – 2000cc 11p
Over 2000cc 17p

 

Engine size Diesel
1600cc or less 12p
1601cc – 2000cc 14p
Over 2000cc 17p

Other points to be aware of about the advisory fuel rates:

  • Employers do not need a dispensation to use these rates.
  • Employees driving employer provided cars are not entitled to use these rates to claim tax relief if employers reimburse them at lower rates. Such claims should be based on the actual costs incurred.
  • The advisory rates are not binding where an employer can demonstrate that the cost of business travel in employer provided cars is higher than the guideline mileage rates. The higher cost would need to be agreed with HMRC under a dispensation.

If you would like to discuss your car policy, please contact us.

Internet link: HMRC advisory fuel rates

P11d deadline approaching

The forms P11D, and where appropriate P9D, which report details of expenses and benefits provided to employees and directors for the year ended 5 April 2014, are due for submission to HMRC by 6 July 2014. The process of gathering the necessary information can take some time, so it is important that this process is not left to the last minute.

Employees pay tax on benefits provided as shown on the P11D, either via a PAYE coding notice adjustment or through the self assessment system. In addition, the employer has to pay Class 1A National Insurance Contributions at 13.8% on the provision of most benefits. The calculation of this liability is detailed on the P11D(b) form.

HMRC have updated their expenses and benefits toolkit for 2013/14 and record keeping for 2014/15. The toolkit consists of a checklist which may be used by advisers or employers to check they are completing the forms P11D correctly.

If you would like any help with the completion of the forms or the calculation of the associated Class 1A National Insurance liability please get in touch.

Internet links: http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/payerti/exb/forms.htm  Toolkit

Newsletter – April 2013

In this month’s enews we report on changes to the tax rules for loans to participators and other issues pertinent to employers with many deadlines approaching.

Please contact us if you would like any further information.

Loans from a company to shareholders

Draft legislation has been published which confirms an announcement made in Budget 2013 and which has effect from 20 March 2013.

A close company (which generally includes an owner managed company) may be charged to tax in certain circumstances where it has made a loan or advance to individuals who have an interest or shares in the company (known as participators). Loans and advances are also caught where they are made to an associate of the individual such as a family member.

The corporation tax charge is 25% where the loan is outstanding nine months after the end of the accounting period.

The new law will prevent the practise of avoiding the payment of the tax charge by repaying the loan before the tax is due (nine months after the end of the accounting period) and then effectively withdrawing the same money shortly after. This change may also prevent refunds of the 25% tax already paid where loans are redrawn shortly after.

This change may affect a number of owner managed companies and we will be happy to discuss this with you.

Internet links: Press release HMRC TIIN

Increase in NMW rates

The Government has announced increases in the NMW rates which will come into effect on 1 October 2013:

  • the adult rate will increase by 12p to £6.31 an hour
  • the rate for 18-20 year olds will increase by 5p to £5.03 an hour
  • the rate for 16-17 year olds will increase by 4p to £3.72 an hour
  • the apprentice rate will increase by 3p to £2.68 an hour and
  • the accommodation offset increases from the current £4.82 to £4.91.

Katja Hall, CBI Chief Policy Director, said:

‘Pay restraint has been crucial in creating jobs in this tough economic climate.’

‘The LPC has struck a careful balance in setting the rates given sluggish growth, particularly in recommending a cautious approach to youth pay.’

‘The LPC will need to monitor the impact of raising the adult rate very carefully. Given average earnings this year are already lower than expected, we must make sure the minimum wage doesn’t limit jobs in key sectors, by outstripping pay across the rest of the workforce.’

‘The law is clear that employers must pay apprentices the legal minimum wage. It is right that ministers tighten up compliance and enforcement.’

Internet links: Press release CBI press release

HMRC launch Managing Serious Defaulters (MSD)

Following on from Managing Deliberate Defaulters (MDD) programme, under MSD HMRC will closely monitor the tax affairs of more individuals and businesses who have deliberately evaded tax for up to five years.

From 1 April 2013, HMRC is also extending the close monitoring of the tax affairs of those who deliberately choose not to pay what they owe. MSD replaces and expands the MDD scheme.

David Gauke, Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury, said:

‘Increasingly, evaders are using contrived insolvency to evade tax, either through liquidation of a business or bankruptcy of an individual. It is only fair that someone who has deliberately tried to evade tax should face extra scrutiny from HMRC.’

‘This measure, along with those announced in the Budget, demonstrates that we will crack down on people who don’t pay what they owe.’

Internet link: Government news

Employer end of year forms

HMRC are reminding employers that in order to avoid penalties they must file the Employer Annual Return (P35 and P14s) online and on time. The vast majority of employers must file electronically and the deadline for submission of the forms is 19 May 2013, which this year falls on a Sunday.

Where employers do not file their annual return by 19 May they incur a penalty of £100 per 50 (or fewer) employees for every month (or part month) that their return is late.

With the introduction of RTI for the majority of employers from 6 April 2013 this will be the final P35 submission for many.

If you are unsure whether you need to complete a return this year please do get in touch.

Internet links: HMRC end of year guidance Employer Bulletin

Employment Particulars

The government has updated the template of written employment particulars.

The template is an example of a written statement of employment particulars which meets the requirements of employment law.

Where an employee is employed for more than a month the employer must give them a written statement of employment particulars.

Internet link: Government Publications

P11d deadline approaching

The forms P11D, and where appropriate P9D, which report employees and directors benefits and expenses for the year ended 5 April 2013, are due for submission to HMRC by 6 July 2013. The process of gathering the necessary information can take some time, so it is important that this process is not left to the last minute.

Employees pay tax on benefits provided as shown on the P11D, either via a PAYE coding notice adjustment or through the self assessment system. In addition, the employer has to pay Class 1A National Insurance Contributions at 13.8% on the provision of most benefits. The calculation of this liability is detailed on the P11D(b) form.

HMRC have issued some guidance as to common errors on the forms in the latest Employer Bulletin. These include the following which can delay processing and cause problems with employees’ tax codes:

  • Not ticking the ‘director’ box if the employee is a director.
  • Not including a description or abbreviation, where amounts are included in sections A, B, L, M or N of the form.
  • Leaving the ‘cash equivalent’ box empty where you’ve entered a figure in the corresponding ‘cost to you’ box of a section.
  • Not correctly completing the box in Part 5 of form P35 (Employers Annual Return) or the declaration on the final FPS/EPS submission (for those employers operating PAYE in ‘real time’) to indicate whether or not P11Ds are due.
  • Where a benefit has been provided for mixed business and private use, entering only the value of the private-use portion – you must report the full gross value of the benefit.
  • Not completing the fuel benefit box/field where this applies. This means an amended P11D has to be sent in.
  • Incorrectly completing the ‘from’ and ‘to’ dates in the ‘Dates car was available’ boxes. For example entering 06/04/2012 to 05/04/2013 to indicate the car was available throughout that year. If the car was available in the previous tax year, the ‘from’ box should not be completed and if the car is to be available in the next tax year, the ‘to’ box should not be completed.

Correct P11D completion is complex. If you would like any help with the forms P11D or the calculation of the associated Class 1A National Insurance liability please get in touch.

Internet links: http://www.hmrc.gov.uk/paye/exb/index.htm Employer Bulletin

Scottish rate of income tax

On 14 February 2013 Scottish and UK ministers agreed the final text of the Memorandum of Understanding between HMRC and the Scottish Government covering the Scottish rate of income tax.

The Scottish rate will commence from a date to be set by the UK Government, expected to be April 2016.

Internet links: HMRC What’s New FAQs

328 sleeps to Christmas!

According to my IPad app (other devices are available!), today (31st January 2013) there are just 328 sleeps until Christmas, which I guess means there should be 365 sleeps until this day in 2014.  So, why should I care about that then, I hear you ask?

Well, yesterday (30th January – 1 day early), we submitted our final tax return to HMRC to continue our 100% record to meet the annual 31st January HMRC tax return deadline.  I want to say a big thank you to our clients for working with us to achieve the deadline.

It always interests me, how our clients, some of who, have been with us for many years, always follow the same patterns.  We get the keen ones, who bring in the information as soon as possible after 6th April, so that they can be in the smug satisfaction of knowing that all is taken care of, for another year, well in advance and then we get the others who like to leave it until the last moment, so that they can enjoy the thrill of the chase, as we rush to complete everything in time, and of course all of the others in between.

Now, I have to say, that I do quite enjoy the final push to the deadline, it’s very satisfying watching the percentage of completed tax returns increasing as we get nearer to the date, coupled with the worry of “can we do it?”, it can become quite a buzz!

So, why have I decided to start chasing our clients much earlier for their information this year, am I looking to have a holiday in January or something (not sure about Wales in January!), or is there some more sinister reason?

Well, lets look at the benefits of getting your tax return done early:

  • the smugness of being able to relax in the satisfaction of knowing that “tax doesn’t have to be taxing” and you are all compliant for another year, so can relax, one less worry
  • by getting your tax return done early, we can calculate any liability and give you much more warning of what you will have to pay the following January, which can lesssen the shock, which sometimes occurs, when you have had a particularly good year
  • similarly, if we calculate that you are due a tax refund (particulalrly might apply to CIS sub-contractors), you will have the refund much earlier
  • it will, avoid you getting lots of e-mails and phone calls from us, chasing you, for your information – it will get us off your back for another year!
  • perhaps I could have that long-awaited holiday in Wales in January!

So – how soon COULD you get your information in to us:

  • if you are self-employed, with no PAYE income as well, as soon as possible after your year end date
  • If you are on PAYE, either 31st May, if you receive no benefits, or end July if you do (these are the deadlines for your employer to give you your P60/P11d)

So, in reality then, bearing in mind the latest date above is 31st July, if we could have all of the information in by then, why dont we say that providing we do, we’ll get all of our clients tax returns done by 31st October and we can all relax once the clocks go back, safe in the knowledge, that we are all compliant, knowing exactly what our liabilities are.

Which means, I can finally have that 2 week holiday in Wales in January, my family will be so pleased!

So, will this happen?  Who knows, we’ll see what happens.  If you are worried, check back next year to see how we did and, in the meantime, can I be the first to wish you a Happy Christmas 2013, safe in the knowledge that you won’t be worrying about that pesky tax return.